Poll: Should Whistleblowers Be Protected?

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Whistleblowers play a significant role in exposing corporate corruption and fraud. In many cases, it is not uncommon for whistleblowers to experience discrimination and/or harsh mistreatment from other employees as retribution for exposing the employers’ wrongdoing. Current U.S. law states that whistleblowers are protected against employer retaliation, but adequate protection is not always provided.

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Which Senator Killed the Whistleblower Bill?

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As reported by the Government Accountability Project, the search is on to identify the senator who sabotaged the ratification of the Whistleblower Protection Enhancement Act (WPEA), a law that would strengthen legal protections for workers who report fraud and corruption.

Last month, the Senate passed the WPEA by a voice vote in the first step of the approval process. The bill then went to the House where it was cleared unanimously with some amendments, and returned to the Senate for a final vote. Just before representatives adjourned, a single senator voted against the bill, putting an anonymous hold on it. The hold was enough to abolish the bill because there was not enough time to overcome rigorous legislative procedures to eliminate it before the end of the session.

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$26.6M Won't Change Me, Whistleblower Says

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By Jayne O’Donnell, USA TODAY

Seven years ago, David Franklin sued his former employer, Warner-Lambert, for illegally marketing an epilepsy drug for unapproved uses. Little did he know how much that whistleblower lawsuit would unsettle his life.

The microbiologist ended up blackballed in the pharmaceutical industry and had to endure an emotionally and financially draining odyssey as a whistleblower.

“This has been the most disruptive thing that could ever take place

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$26.6M Won’t Change Me, Whistleblower Says

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By Jayne O’Donnell, USA TODAY

Seven years ago, David Franklin sued his former employer, Warner-Lambert, for illegally marketing an epilepsy drug for unapproved uses. Little did he know how much that lawsuit would unsettle his life.

The microbiologist ended up blackballed in the pharmaceutical industry and had to endure an emotionally and financially draining odyssey as a whistleblower. “This has been the most disruptive thing that could ever take place in someone’s life,” he says.

But today, at 42, Franklin is a very wealthy man. He was awarded $26.6 million as part of a $430 million settlement Pfizer — which didn’t become involved until it bought

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Pfizer to Settle Drug Marketing Suit for $400 Million

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May 13 (Bloomberg) — Pfizer Inc., the world’s largest drugmaker, agreed to pay at least $400 million to settle civil charges after a whistleblower alleged that Parke-Davis paid kickbacks to encourage doctors to prescribe the epilepsy drug Neurontin for other ailments, people familiar with the case said.

The settlement stems from a U.S. investigation of collusion among drug companies and doctors to bill government health programs for free samples given as promotions. AstraZeneca Plc and Tap Pharmaceuticals Inc. pleaded guilty to criminal charges and agreed to settlements totaling more than $1.2 billion.

“The cost, while seeming to be a lot, probably is worth it to get this issue out of the way,” said Ira Loss, a health-policy analyst at Washington Analysis, which advises institutional investors on federal policy. “Pfizer doesn’t want to have a trial about this, and I don’t think any other major company would either. It’s just easier to pay it off and move on.”

Pfizer, which acquired Parke-Davis when it bought Warner- Lambert Co. for about $120 billion in June 2000, said in a regulatory filing in March it set aside $427 million in the fourth quarter in connection with efforts to

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Pfizer to Settle Drug Marketing Suit for $400 Mln

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May 13 (Bloomberg) — Pfizer Inc., the world’s largest drugmaker, agreed to pay at least $400 million to settle civil charges its Parke-Davis unit paid kickbacks to encourage doctors to prescribe the epilepsy drug Neurontin for other ailments, people familiar with the case said.

The settlement stems from a U.S. investigation of collusion among drug companies and doctors to bill government health programs for free samples given as promotions. AstraZeneca Plc and Tap Pharmaceuticals Inc. pleaded guilty to criminal charges and agreed to settlements totaling more than $1.2 billion.

“The cost, while seeming to be a lot, probably is worth it to get this issue out of the way,” said Ira Loss, a health-policy analyst at Washington Analysis, which advises institutional investors on federal policy. “Pfizer doesn’t want to have a trial about

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